Date of Award

8-12-2014

Degree Type

Closed Dissertation

Department

Counseling and Psychological Services

First Advisor

Stephen D. Truscott, Psy.D.

Second Advisor

Nicole Patton Terry, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Joel Meyers, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Paul A. Alberto, Ph.D.

Fifth Advisor

Rebecca Waugh, Ph.D.

Abstract

Although a growing body of literature indicates that preschool and/or prekindergarten programs can improve child outcomes, research evidence suggests that some preschool teachers may not have the prerequisite content and pedagogical knowledge needed to effectively teach young children critical emergent language and literacy skills. While there a number of factors impacting emergent literacy, phonological awareness has been shown to be highly predictive of later reading achievement. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of consultation model with performance feedback on teacher’s implementation of a targeted phonological awareness intervention. A single subject multiple baseline across group design was used to determine if a functional relation exist between teachers’ implementation of targeted small group instruction and student performance on measures of phonological awareness skills and between performance feedback and teacher adherence to curriculum implementation. While a functional relation could not be confirmed, the findings from this study provide initial support for the use of consultation with performance feedback in preschool classrooms to improve academic skills. Additionally, the findings from this study suggest that the use of performance feedback along with a targeted phonological awareness intervention may be an effective method of improving phonological awareness skills in for students who may be at-risk of reading failure. The results of the study also suggest that teachers were satisfied with the consultation with performance feedback process and found the phonological awareness intervention to be acceptable and socially valid.

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