Date of Award

Summer 8-11-2011

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Counseling and Psychological Services

First Advisor

Dr. Catherine Chang

Second Advisor

Dr. Greg Brack

Third Advisor

Dr. Phyllis Gerard

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Joanna White

Abstract

A concern following school counselors participation in professional training is whether or not they are able to implement information learned. One such professional training that school counselors attend is Adventure Based Counseling (ABC). ABC groups are effective for addressing a myriad of concerns with young people. ABC groups address problem-solving skills, self-esteem, responsibility, goal setting, cooperation, and interpersonal skills. Although many school counselors have participated in ABC training, there is a lack of research that supports whether they are actually utilizing these techniques with their students. Additionally, current research does not provide information as to how training programs and school dynamics may be improved to allow for increased utilization of ABC with students; therefore, the purpose of this study is to understand the barriers that inhibit and the factors that support school counselors' ability to implement information learned from Professional Trainings, with a focus on ABC training. This qualitative study took a phenomenological approach, with a constructivist philosophical stance. Data sources included interviews with school counselors, which provided descriptions of their Professional and ABC training experiences and reasons for either using or not using Professional and ABC activities. The themes included What Professional and ABC training sessions school counselors attended and What they are implementing that they learned from these sessions. In addition, school counselors' various reactions to Professional and ABC training, such as Choice, Type of Delivery, Presenter Qualities, Time and Applicability were delineated. Results also included information pertaining to the Impact and Logistics of using information learned at Professional and ABC trainings. The results of this study may have important implications for school counselors, counselor educators, and administrators related to the implementation of skills learned from Professional and ABC training experiences. Implications for future research and limitations of this study are discussed.

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