Date of Award

Winter 1-6-2012

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Counseling and Psychological Services

First Advisor

Dr. Gregory L. Brack, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Dr. JoAnna F. White, Ed.D.

Third Advisor

Dr. Roger O. Weed, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Kevin B. Stoltz, Ph.D.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

THE RELATIONSHIP OF LIFESTYLE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL

BIRTH ORDER WITH CAREER DECISION

SELF-EFFICACY

by

Ronald M. Herndon

Over the course of the last several decades Adlerians have demonstrated the vocational utility of Individual Psychology and the constructs of lifestyle and psychological birth order in determining career interests, preferences, and choices (Watkins, 1984a; Watts & Engels, 1995). However, these constructs have not been examined in terms of their relationship to career decision self-efficacy (CDSE). This study examined the relationship of the Adlerian lifestyle and psychological birth order constructs with CDSE among undergraduates (N = 156) at a major southeastern university. Participants were administered a survey packet containing a demographic questionnaire, the BASIS-A Inventory, the White-Campbell Psychological Birth Order Inventory (PBOI), and the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSES). The BASIS-A Inventory and the PBOI are instruments measuring the Adlerian constructs of lifestyle and psychological birth order. Both of these instruments do not yield a singular overall score for these constructs. Rather, scores are reported as scale totals corresponding to the factors associated with these constructs. The CDSES is an instrument measuring career decision self-efficacy, which yields scores for the overall measure as well as the scales corresponding to the factors associated with the construct. Results indicate that many statistically significant relationships exist among the factors of lifestyle with the factor scales of CDSE and overall CDSE, including belonging/social interest (BSI) and striving for perfection (P) subscale. Further, the P subscale proved to be a statistically significant predictor of overall CDSE (ρ < .05). The factors of psychological birth order had fewer statistically significant relationships with CDSE and associated factors and did not demonstrate statistically significant predictive ability with CDSE. The significant relationships and predictive ability of specific factors of the lifestyle construct, as well as the significant relationships of psychological birth order, found in this study have implications for increasing the theoretical knowledge base and vocational applicability of Individual Psychology as well as gaining further practical understanding of utilizing these constructs in counseling and vocational assessment.

Share

COinS