Date of Award

Fall 12-18-2014

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Policy Studies

First Advisor

Dr. Joyce E. King

Second Advisor

Dr. Janice Fournillier

Third Advisor

Dr. Kristen L. Buras

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Layli Maparyan

Abstract

ABSTRACT

BEYOND YOUR PERCEPTION: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF BLACK PARENT-DAUGHTER RELATIONSHIPS AND HIP HOP INFLUENCES ON ADOLESCENT GIRLS

by

Sherell A. McArthur

This study is situated at the nexus of three bodies of literature and research and sought to contribute to all three: the socialization of Black girls, hip hop as a pedagogical tool and critical media literacy. My research explored how might the Black parent-daughter relationship serve as a vehicle by which the girls come to understand, submit to, and/or resist the stereotypical images prevalent in the hip-hop culture? I co-created a critical media literacy collective with high school, African American girls where we explored personal identity development in relationship to representations of African-American women in the media. It was through my interactions with the girls in this collective, named Beyond Your Perception (BYP). Through this collective, the primary data sources were qualitative interviews, focus groups, and documents. A thematic analysis revealed Black girls represent the dominant narratives within the cultural movement of hip hop by ascribing to cultural mores like fashion trends, hairstyles and language. They also consciously choose to resist the stereotypical imagery (e.g., loud, angry, sexually loose, etc.) and are able to compose powerful counter-narratives to the monolithic depictions of Black women in the media. By examining the data it was evident that parents engage with hip hop media by listening to the music and watching television shows and music videos, however the ways in which they engage their daughters in dialogue pertaining to the messages within hip hop media is sporadic and suggests the need for parents to become media literate. The implications of this study suggest the need for the creation of collaborative and emancipatory spaces for Black girls, media literacy education for parents, and culturally relevant pedagogy.

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