Date of Award

12-17-2014

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Gerontology Institute

First Advisor

Candace L. Kemp

Second Advisor

Patricia C. Griffiths

Third Advisor

Jon A. Sanford

Fourth Advisor

Heying Jenny Zhan

Fifth Advisor

Elisabeth O. Burgess

Abstract

Data from the CG ASSIST program were evaluated to investigate whether modifying shared environmental factors within caregiving dyads influences caregiver perceptions. Revisions to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework for cohabitating care-partners are proposed to emphasize the entwined connections between caregivers and care recipients. Eleven older Veteran care-recipients and their informal caregivers participated in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether an in-home training intervention with assistive technology influenced how caregivers perceived the level of assistance they provided and the level of care needed by their care-recipients. Caregivers who received the training (Training Group, n=6) perceived their assistance as more appropriate and more accurately assessed their care-recipient’s needs than caregivers who were not trained (Novice Group, n=5). Though more research is needed, the proposed ICF revisions appear to be a viable framework to illustrate complex interactions within cohabitating caregiving dyads.

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