Date of Award

11-17-2009

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Dr. Sheryl Strasser - Committee Chair

Second Advisor

Dr. Danjun Dai - Committee Member

Third Advisor

John Steward - Committee Member

Abstract

Pedestrian injuries and fatalities due to motor vehicle crashes are a significant public health concern, and the urban campus of Georgia State University poses unique challenges to pedestrian safety issues. Previous studies of the built environment have link several features to increased pedestrian crash occurrences. Once identified, these features can be modified to create a healthier environment for pedestrians. This study examines the relationship between specific features of the built environment and pedestrian crash events. Environmental audits were conducted to collect information about the built environment around Georgia State campus, and pedestrian crash data was obtained from GDOT. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was used to create a visual representation of this data in order to establish spatial relationships between the built environment and pedestrian crash events. Results show both positive and negative correlations between certain built environment features and pedestrian crashes. GIS was established as a useful tool for evaluating the spatial distribution and relationship between the built environment and pedestrian injury within a localized area, and provides a springboard for future research that seeks to study this association on a larger scale.

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