Date of Award

Fall 12-15-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

IKE S. OKOSUN, MS, MPH, PhD, FRSPH

Second Advisor

SANDRA BULENS, MPH

Third Advisor

RUSSELL KEMPKER, MPH

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: National obesity rates are leading to higher rates of Type 2 Diabetes, increasing the number of people at risk of invasive infections with Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (iMRSA) upon onset of ESRD and hemodialysis. However, an association between adiposity and risk of iMRSA has not been researched. AIM: The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiological characteristics of an iMRSA cohort in the Atlanta metro area between 2005-2008; to examine BMI-related health outcomes within the cohort; and to compare proportions of BMI categories in this cohort to BRFSS data. METHODS: Surveillance data collected by the CDC EIP program on iMRSA in Atlanta, Georgia was used. BMI was calculated for each eligible case. Statistical analysis was carried out in SPSS. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed on select variables. A p-value of < 0.05 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to determine significance. BRFSS BMI data for Georgia was compared to the study population. RESULTS: Overweight and obese cases were more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes by regression analysis. Cases with diabetes were at greater odds of having undergone dialysis within the previous year (univariate OR=2.3, p=0.000; multivariate OR=2.5, p=0.000). The proportion of iMRSA patients with diabetes is much greater (42.8%) than in the general population of the United States (7.8-10.7%). DISCUSSION: The results indicate that there may be a higher risk for iMRSA in overweight and obese individuals, particularly if other adiposity-related health problems are present.

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