Date of Award

Spring 5-16-2014

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Dr.Okosun

Second Advisor

John Steward

Abstract

Abstract

Background

: This study examines factors that are more associated with risk of sexually transmitted bacterial and viral diseases in a representative sample of American adults.

Methods

: This is a cross sectional study using secondary data from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is the software used in analysis of descriptive data and logistic regression models. Univariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between risk factors and sexually transmitted diseases. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between risk factors and sexually transmitted diseases while controlling for confounders. A forward stepwise logistic regression analysis was to determine the best predictors of each type of sexually transmitted diseases.

Results

: The sample size for the study population is n=9,216. There were four observed risk factors that were significantly associated with both bacterial sexually transmitted diseases as well as viral sexually transmitted diseases at the 0.05 level of probability. Lack of health insurance was associated with 1.66 increased odds of sexually transmitted viral disease compared to 1.55 increased odds seen in sexually transmitted bacterial disease. History of birth control was associated with 2.61 and 1.66 increased odds in sexually transmitted bacterial disease and sexually transmitted viral disease, respectively. Having first sexual encounter in adulthood was associated with 3.01 increased odds in sexually transmitted bacterial disease and 1.72 times increased odds in sexually transmitted viral diseases. Multiple sexual partners was associated with decreased odds in both sexually transmitted bacterial and viral sexually transmitted diseases.

Conclusions

: The results of this study indicating differences in factors that are associated with sexually transmitted bacteria diseases and sexually transmitted viral diseases provide evidence for developing public health intervention that is based on type of infection. Public health intervention programs that address sex education, effect of IV drug use, the importance of health insurance, the use of birth control, circumcision, and smoking cessation may help to curb the prevalence of both sexually transmitted bacterial and viral infections in at-risk groups.

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