Date of Award

Spring 5-15-2015

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Dr. Monica Swahn

Second Advisor

Dr. Scott Weaver

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of and identify specific alcohol consumption patterns related to intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization among youth in Kampala, Uganda.

Methods: Data were collected on 457 youth aged 14-24 years for the 2011 Kampala Youth Survey. Prevalence for intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration were compared for males and females. The relationship between two specific alcohol consumption patterns and intimate partner victimization and perpetration were examined.

Results: In 2011, 32.2% of Kampala youth reported being victims and 20.3% reported being perpetrators of violence against an intimate partner. Females were significantly less likely to report being perpetrators than males (OR= 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.79). Increased frequency of alcohol consumption within the past month was associated with an increased likelihood for intimate partner violence victimization, perpetration, and the overlap variable of being both a victim and perpetrator.

Conclusion: This study identifies specific alcohol consumption patterns that are risk factors for being a victim, a perpetrator, and both a victim and perpetrator of intimate partner violence in youth in the slums of Kampala. It also highlights the need for adolescent-specific studies regarding intimate partner violence due to gender differences.

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