Date of Award

Spring 5-15-2015

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Sheryl Strasser

Second Advisor

Brittany Carter

Abstract

Objectives.

We examined the patterns of association that exist between socio-demographic variables and the risk of having an illicit substance as a primary substance of abuse.

Methods.

A cross-sectional study on secondary data from the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) observed socio-demographic patterns among those over 18 years old admitted for substance abuse treatment in Georgia during 2009-2012.

Results.

The distribution of licit substance users and illicit substance users was significantly different along all socio-demographic variables. Risk of admission for an illicit substance was highest among those unemployed, living independently, and who did not graduate from high school.

Conclusion.

The findings of this study show that admission for treatment of an illicit substance are congruent with what was previously known about groups with the highest risk. However other findings about gender differences, age, and independent living promote changes in prevention and directions for further research.

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