Date of Award

Fall 1-8-2016

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

First Advisor

Dr. Solomon I. Okosun

Second Advisor

Dr. Kim Ramsey-White

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Micronutrient deficiency (vitamin A, iron, and iodine) is highly prevalent in the Dominican Republic as indicated by food consumption patterns, which are not reflective of consumption of micronutrient dense foods. Previous studies (Neves, Ramalho, Padilha, & Saunders, 2014) have shown that nutrition education offered by prenatal providers has a positive impact on nutrition outcomes in mothers and children. Little research exists which examines the difference in micronutrient consumption among mothers in the Dominican Republic. The aim of this study was to determine differences in micronutrient rich food consumption of mothers in the Dominican Republic based on type of prenatal provider (General practitioner, Obstetrics/gynecology (OBGYN) or no Provider).

METHODS: The 2007 Dominican Republic DHS dataset was employed for this study. Odds ratios from multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine association between sources of prenatal service and micronutrient food intake. Statistical adjustments were made for residence, wealth index, education, marital status, smoking age and number children ever had.

RESULTS: Compared with mothers who did not utilize any of the prenatal services, mothers who sought care from General practitioners and OBGYN had increased odds of consuming vitamin A, iodine and iron micronutrient rich foods, adjusting for residence, wealth index, education, marital status, smoking age and mother’s total number of children. However, the associations were not statistically significant. Compared to mothers who did not use prenatal care, mothers who used the services of General practitioners and OB/GYNs had greater odds, (OR=1.09; 95% CI:0.85-1.41) and (OR=1.29; 95% CI:1.01-1.65) respectively, of consuming at least one micronutrient food. Compared to mothers who did not use prenatal care, mothers who used the services of General practitioners (OR=1.31; 95% CI:1.00-1.70) and OB/GYNs and (OR=1.36; 95% CI:1.05-1.75), had greater odds of consuming at least two micronutrient foods. The corresponding odds ratios for consuming all three micronutrients for mothers using the services of General practitioners and OBGYN were 1.48 (95% CI=0.80-2.74) and 1.51 (95% CI=0.84-2.74), respectively.

Prenatal Care and Micronutrient Dense Foods 3

DISCUSSION: Improvements and access to programs providing nutrition education for prenatal care providers, and medical and nutrition assistance to poor mothers may help to increase micronutrient rich food consumption in the Dominican Republic.

KEY WORDS: micronutrient, diet, maternal, Dominican Republic

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