Date of Award

Spring 4-29-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Michael P. Eriksen

Second Advisor

Ike S. Okosun

Abstract

Previous studies based on data from the World Bank have shown a negative association between governance and HIV prevalence. Using the Index of African Governance, this study investigates the correlation between governance and HIV prevalence in all African countries (N = 53) in order to determine which dimension of governance is more predictive of this relationship. No statistically significant association was found between governance and HIV prevalence across the whole spectrum of countries. In the multivariate analysis, the most predictive dimension of governance, “Rule of Law, Transparency and Corruption” was found to be positively associated with HIV prevalence across all African countries (p <.001), Beta =.816 .When grouped by clusters, only two regions (North and West Africa) out of five showed negative significant associations between governance and HIV prevalence. The analysis of socio cultural and geographical factors revealed significant associations with HIV prevalence; religion and HIV prevalence ( p < .003), region, and HIV prevalence ( p < .001). French colonial heritage was found to be negatively associated with HIV prevalence. This study suggests that geographical location and religion predict HIV prevalence rather than governance. International organizations and public health program managers should consider these findings in the implementation of large multi-country and regional HIV programs in Africa.

Included in

Public Health Commons

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