Date of Award

5-10-2014

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Lindsey Cohen

Second Advisor

Lisa Armistead

Third Advisor

Julia Perilla

Abstract

Pediatric procedural distress has been linked to a number of short- and long-term negative outcomes for the patient. A body of literature has found that one of the strongest predictors of children's medical distress or coping is parents' behavior. The majority of this research has been conducted on predominately Caucasian samples. The purpose of this study was to explore the types and frequencies of parent and child behavior, as well as the associations between parent behavior and child distress and coping in a sample of Spanish-speaking Latino parent-child dyads. The findings suggest that there may be differences in Latino parent and child behavior when compared to the extant literature. This study is a first step in exploring parent and child behaviors in this vastly growing and understudied population. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are warranted in order to further explore if existing interventions are culturally appropriate for this population.

Available for download on Friday, April 24, 2015

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