Date of Award

Spring 5-12-2017

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Dr. Katherine Masyn

Second Advisor

Dr. Matthew Magee

Third Advisor

John Steward

Abstract

Objectives We first sought to assess if bicyclist typology was associated with health. Second, we investigated whether bicyclist typology was related to health through physical activity and commute bicycling. Finally, we sought to develop profiles of disposition toward commute bicycling following proposed changes to a specific destination and the significance of pertinent covariates.

Methods Data from the 2014 Georgia State University-Bicycling Survey were used. We first estimated the adjusted odds of worse health-related quality of life by bicyclist typology. A mediation model was then used to estimate the relative total and direct effects of bicyclist typology on health-related quality of life and relative indirect effects through physical activity and commute bicycling. A finite mixture modeling approach was used to identify latent classes of disposition toward whether proposed changes to a specific destination would increase likelihood of commute bicycling. The manual 3-Step protocol was used to assess the effect of covariates on the probability of latent class membership.

Results Respondents who had never bicycled, were not motivated to commute bicycle, and who required greater bicycle facilities to feel comfortable commute bicycling had higher odds of worse health-related quality of life. Physical activity and, to a lesser extent, commute bicycling status mediated the effect of bicyclist typology on health-related quality of life. The seven-class solution was decided on as the “best” model for disposition toward whether proposed destination improvements would increase the likelihood of commute bicycling. Several covariates were identified that impact the probability of latent class assignment.

Conclusions Initial evidence of a health disparity by bicyclist typology was revealed. Physical activity appears to serve as the primary means through which bicyclist typology has an effect on health. Urban environments that make physical activity, including commute bicycling, more comfortable for a larger proportion of the population may be a potential important health intervention. Understanding the patterns of disposition toward whether proposed destination improvements would increase the likelihood of commute bicycling may assist in targeting and prioritizing commute bicycling-related interventions toward subpopulations of interest.

Available for download on Monday, April 29, 2019

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