Date of Award

Spring 5-14-2021

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Dr. Richard Rothenberg

Second Advisor

Dr. Shannon Self-Brown

Abstract

Background: Seasonal influenza results in a high burden in children, especially children under 5 years old. Vaccination, which is routinely recommended for every individual over the age of 6 months, is one of the most effective interventions in preventing severe illness and death from seasonal influenza. There is a disparity in vaccinations practices between high and low socioeconomic households, which may lead to a greater impact of influenza on children in these households. The purpose of this study is to explore potential relationships between socioeconomic and vaccination practice variables.

Methods: Using 2018 data from the National Immunization Survey, a biserial correlation between household Income-Poverty Ratio and vaccination status at 24 months of age was conducted as well as a linear regression of household Income-Poverty Ratio and age in days of first influenza vaccination. A logistic regression between household Income-Poverty Ratio and vaccination status at 24 months of age was additionally conducted. All analyses were done in RStudio.

Results: There was a small correlation between household Income-Poverty Ratio and vaccination status at 24 months of -0.231 (p-value

Conclusion: There is a relationship between socioeconomic status and influenza vaccination practices which may impact and amplify the burden of influenza on children in lower income households.

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