Date of Award

8-6-2007

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

First Advisor

Carrie L. Manning - Chair

Second Advisor

Scott E. Graves

Third Advisor

Charles R. Hankla

Abstract

Since gaining independence, sub-Saharan Africa has experienced periods of internal conflict at higher rates than other regions. The region has also experienced protracted economic problems. Many African countries have implemented International Monetary Fund (IMF) programs designed to improve a state’s long-term economic viability. IMF conditionality, however, has led to a host of problems in sub-Saharan Africa that potentially increase the risk of experiencing internal conflict. The results of this research demonstrate that the implementation of the Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility significantly increases a country’s risk of experiencing armed civil conflict. Neither the Structural Adjustment Facility nor the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility have the same affect, though prior conflict, higher GDPs, negative GDP growth, moderate levels of social fractionalization, transitional regimes and the presence of enclave economies do increase conflict risk.

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