Date of Award

5-8-2020

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Geosciences

First Advisor

David Iwaniec, PhD

Second Advisor

Richard Milligan, PhD

Third Advisor

Chris Wyczalkowski, PhD

Abstract

This research focused on identifying the spatial distribution of two potential climate hazards in the City of Atlanta, Georgia. Extreme heat (1) is one of Atlanta’s most significant threats, and flooding (2) continues to plague its communities. Potential socioeconomic predictors of extreme heat (poverty, percent of black residents) proved not to have strong relationships with high land surface temperature (LST) at the census tract level. Urban flooding was found to be at its highest risk in southern areas of the city. A content analysis of city governance was performed to see how much of the previously identified hazards are addressed in Atlanta city planning. Analysis showed that flooding is the most planned for, followed by drought, and then heat. Despite heat posing the largest threat, there were minimal climate resilience strategies to explicitly address it. These results can inform improved climate planning and policy within the city of Atlanta.

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