Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0031-315X

Date of Award

Fall 12-2-2020

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

Public Health

First Advisor

Dr. XIANGMING FANG

Second Advisor

Dr. SHANNON SELF-BROWN

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Intimate partner violence is a critical and global public health issue that affects numerous women, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studies from conflict and post-conflict Sub-Saharan Africa nations revealed an increasing risk of violence against women in areas of conflict. Cote d'Ivoire is a West African nation that encountered multiple conflicts from 2002 to 2011.

AIM:

This study aimed at examining the underlying factors of violence against women in a post-conflict context.

METHODS:

This study analyzed data from the 2012 Cote d'Ivoire Demographic Health Survey. The outcome variable was any Intimate partner violence. The predictor variables were socio-demographic among women, economic opportunities, and partner-related characteristics. Three multivariate logistic regression models were performed, and odds ratios (OR) with a confidence interval of 95% (CI 95%) were estimated.

RESULTS:

Just over 30% of respondents in the sample (3,500) ever experienced any Intimate partner violence. Respondents’ age, religion, wealth index, residency, and region were significantly related to Intimate partner violence. Also, partner's education level, alcohol consumption, and polygamous status were significantly associated with IPV. However, results also indicated that respondents' level of education, occupation, and decision-making on large purchases were not associated with Intimate partner violence.

CONCLUSION:

In Cote d'Ivoire, policymakers should consider these risk factors and design intervention methods based on the ecological model to prevent intimate partner violence.

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