Date of Award

5-12-2017

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Tricia Z. King

Second Advisor

Robin Morris

Third Advisor

Jessica Turner

Abstract

To study potential hyperactivity and hyperconnectivity based on the latent resource hypothesis, this study assessed functional connectivity in survivors of childhood brain tumors compared to their healthy peers during an attention task using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses and evaluated for a relationship with performance. Twenty-three survivors and 23 healthy controls completed a letter n-back task in the scanner. An empirically-based seed was placed in the parietal lobe, a theoretical seed was placed in the hippocampus, and a control seed was placed in the occipital lobe. Differences in both performance and functional connectivity networks from each seed emerged between groups, with some findings supporting the latent resource hypothesis and other networks showing compensatory function in survivors. Attention networks, phonological networks, and executive function networks were all found to differ between controls and survivors.

Available for download on Friday, March 29, 2019

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