Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3450-3381

Date of Award

5-15-2020

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Policy Studies

First Advisor

Nicholas J. Sauers

Second Advisor

Robert C. Hendrick

Third Advisor

Will C. Rumbaugh

Fourth Advisor

Chantrise Sims-Holliman

Abstract

Novice teacher attrition is an increasingly growing phenomenon faced by the modern United States on an annual basis. Moreover, schools with high minority and high poverty characteristics are continuously struggling to not only recruit newer educators, but also retain them in the field of education. On average, high-needs schools spend approximately $70,000 each year to replace teachers, which equates to be roughly $8,750 per teacher (Djonko-Moore, 2016). Educational leaders are now looking toward the application of established organizational systems and processes to provide a resolution to this problem. The purpose of this qualitative study is to analyze how high-needs schools have successfully utilized organizational systems to reduce novice teacher attrition. With organizational theory and the associated sub-framework of general system theory being employed as the driving theoretical framework, the case study approach was used to examine one high-needs elementary school located within a suburban school district in the state of Georgia. The investigation sought to uncover the different, concrete mechanisms that are currently being used to reduce novice teacher attrition in a single, high-needs school and the reasons for their continued success. Data was collected through three distinct methods, including individual interviews, naturalistic observations, and document analysis. All data captured in the interview and observation phases was openly coded using the NVivo software, with the subsequent employment of axial and selective coding to establish connections that addressed the prevailing purpose of the research and guiding questions. The implications from this study will be used to inform educational leaders of the best practices that can be used to effectively address novice teacher attrition and how those practices can be converted into routine procedures that can be used on a daily basis.

File Upload Confirmation

1

Share

COinS