Date of Award

8-11-2015

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Kevin Swartout

Second Advisor

Sarah Cook

Third Advisor

Monica Swahn

Abstract

Sexual violence is a serious problem on college campuses. Nearly twenty-five percent of men report perpetrating some form of sexual violence during their first four years of college. This study examined how dynamics related to membership in all male groups (e.g., fraternities) interacted with alcohol use to predict sexual violence, specifically whether membership in a fraternity affected the relationships between frequency of drinking, peer attitudes, and sexual violence in a sample of college men across time. Data were collected, as part of a larger study, from undergraduate males at a large Southeastern university. In the final model, frequency of drinking and peer support did significantly predict sexual violence perpetration across time for non-fraternity men but not for fraternity men. These findings demonstrate that differences exist between fraternity men and non-fraternity men and illustrate the need for further in-depth research of fraternities.

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