Date of Award

6-9-2006

Degree Type

Closed Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Tracie L. Stewart - Chair

Second Advisor

Eric J. Vanman

Third Advisor

Leslie C. Jackson

Abstract

African Americans’ experiences of racism have been found to be linked with higher levels of psychological distress. Coping responses to racism and racial identity may serve as moderators to this relationship. The present study uses an implicit measure to assess coping responses and racial identity. The main goal was to determine any correlation between implicit and explicit coping responses and racial identity, and between implicit coping responses to racism and explicit coping responses to general stress. A significant correlation was observed between implicit and explicit measures of coping responses and racial identity, and between implicit coping responses to racism and explicit coping responses to general stress. A significant correlation was also observed between implicit coping responses to racism and psychological distress. Findings indicate that implicit measures used in conjunction with explicit measures may provide a more comprehensive assessment of coping responses to racism and racial identity.

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